Championships

Olympic Games

Frequency: Every 4 years
Last: London 2012
Next: Rio de Janeiro 2016
Shooting Events: 15 shooting events
Athletes at the last OG: 390 athletes coming from 108 countries

Medal winners at the Olympic Games 1896 to today

All the Medal Winners at the Olympic Games, from 1896 to today


Actual Shooting Events at the Olympic Games

The Olympic program of the Shooting Sport consists in 15 different events. Olympians compete in nine men’s events and six women’s events in three different disciplines, with five events for rifles, five for pistols and five for shotguns.

Each event consists in a qualification and a final round.

DISCIPLINES

MEN’S EVENTS

WOMEN’S EVENTS

TOTAL EVENTS

RIFLE

50m Rifle 3 Positions

50m Rifle Prone

10m Air Rifle

50m Rifle 3 Positions


10m Air Rifle

5

PISTOL

50m Pistol

25m Rapid Fire Pistol

10m Air Pistol


25m Pistol

10m Air Pistol

5

SHOTGUN

Trap

Double Trap

Skeet

Trap


Skeet

5

TOTAL

9

6

15

RIFLE events

  • The competition consists in a qualification and a final round.
  • During the qualification stages, shots are fired at a 10-ring target in a given time.
  • The best 8 shooters qualify and move to the final round.
  • During the final round, the 10 rings of the target are sub-divided into ten “decimal” score zones; the highest score possible is 10.9.
  • The final score is added to the qualification score to determinate the total scores and the final rankings. 

 

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

 

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

40 shots fired in Prone position

40 shots fired in Standing position

40 shots fired in Kneeling position

- Prior to the first competition shot, any number of sighting shots may be fired.

- Shots are fired within a time limit of 45 minutes in the Prone position, 75 minutes in the Standing position and 60 minutes in the Kneeling position.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 8 shooters enter the final

- The 8 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL ROUND

10 shots fired in Standing position

- Shots are fired on command within a time limit of 75 seconds per shot.

- Each shot is evaluated in decimal tenths.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGET

The target is placed 50 meters far from the shooter’s stand

The target is divided into 10 rings.

10 RING DIAMETER

10.4 mm (about 0,41 inches)

The 10th ring is far smaller then a eurocent or a dollar cent coin.

GUN

Small bore, single loaded rifle in 5.6 mm (.22 Long Rifle) calibre

- Maximum overall weight of 8 kg.

- The stock incorporates adjustments, including a hook type butt plate.

- A rest-stand can be used in Standing position.

SIGHTS

Only metallic sights are permitted

- No optical sights are used.

 

 

50m Rifle Prone Men

 

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

60 shots fired in Prone position

- Prior to the first competition shot, any number of sighting shots may be fired.

- Shots are fired within a time limit of 75 minutes

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 8 shooters enter the final

- The 8 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

10 shots fired in Prone position

- Shots are fired on command within a time limit of 45 seconds per shot.

- Each shot is evaluated in decimal tenths.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGET

The target is placed 50 meters far from the shooter’s stand

- Paper or Electronic targets can be used.

10 RING DIAMETER

10.4 mm (about 0,41 inches)

The 10th ring is far smaller then a eurocent or a dollar cent coin.

GUN

Small bore, single loaded rifle in 5.6 mm (.22 Long Rifle) calibre

- Maximum overall weight of 8 kg.

- The stock incorporates adjustments, including a hook type butt plate.

SIGHTS

Only metallic sights are permitted

- No optical sights are used.


 

50m Rifle 3 Positions Women

 

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

20 shots fired in Prone position

20 shots fired in Standing position

20 shots fired in Kneeling position

- Prior to the first competition shot, any number of sighting shots may be fired.

- Shots are fired within a total time limit of 135 minutes.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 8 shooters enter the final

- The 8 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

10 shots fired in Standing position

- Shots are fired on command within a time limit of 75 seconds per shot.

- Each shot is evaluated in decimal tenths.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGET

The target is placed 50 meters far from the shooter’s stand

The target is divided into 10 rings.

10 RING DIAMETER

10.4 mm (about 0,41 inches)

The 10th ring is far smaller then a eurocent or a dollar cent coin.

GUN

Small bore, single loaded rifle in 5.6 mm (.22 Long Rifle) calibre

- Maximum overall weight of 6.5 kg.

- The stock incorporates adjustments, including a hook type butt plate.

- A rest-stand can be used in Standing position.

SIGHTS

Only metallic sights are permitted

- No optical sights are used.

 

10m Air Rifle Men

 

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

60 shots fired in Standing position

- Prior to the first competition shot, any number of sighting shots may be fired.

- Shots are fired within a time limit of 105 minutes.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 8 shooters enter the final

- The 8 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

10 shots fired in Standing position

- Shots are fired on command within a time limit of 75 seconds per shot.

- Each shot is evaluated in decimal tenths.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGET

The target is placed 10 meters far from the shooter’s stand

The target is divided into 10 rings.

10 RING DIAMETER

0.5 mm (about 0,02 inches)

The 10th ring is far smaller then a pencil tip!

GUN

Single loaded Air Rifle in 4.5 mm (.177”) calibre

- Maximum overall weight of 5.5 kg.

- The pellet is propelled by air compressed either by an external lever or by a pre-compressed air cylinder.

- A rest-stand can be used in Standing position.

SIGHTS

Only metallic sights are permitted

- No optical sights are used.

 

 

10m Air Rifle Women

 

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

40 shots fired in Standing position

- Prior to the first competition shot, any number of sighting shots may be fired.

- Shots are fired within a time limit of 75 minutes.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 8 shooters enter the final

- The 8 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

10 shots fired in Standing position

- Shots are fired on command within a time limit of 75 seconds per shot.

- Each shot is evaluated in decimal tenths.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGET

The target is placed 10 meters far from the shooter’s stand

The target is divided into 10 rings.

10 RING DIAMETER

0.5 mm (about 0,02 inches)

The 10th ring is far smaller then a pencil tip!

GUN

Single loaded Air Rifle in 4.5 mm (.177”) calibre

- Maximum overall weight of 5.5 kg.

- The pellet is propelled by air compressed either by an external lever or by a pre-compressed air cylinder.

- A rest-stand can be used in Standing position.

SIGHTS

Only metallic sights are permitted

- No optical sights are used.

 

PISTOL events

  • The competition consists in a qualification and a final round.
  • During the qualification stages, shots are fired at a 10-ring target in a given time.
  • The best 8 shooters qualify and move to the final round (6 finalists in the 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men event only).
  • During the final round, the 10 rings of the target are sub-divided into ten “decimal” score zones; the highest score possible is 10.9 points (except for the 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men event, which a "hit-or-miss" logic is used to determine scores).
  • The final score is added to the qualification score to determinate the total scores and the final rankings (except for the 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men event, which a "hit-or-miss" logic is used to determine scores in the final).

 

50m Pistol Men

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

60 shots fired in Standing position

- Prior to the first competition shot, any number of sighting shots may be fired.

- Shots are fired within a time limit of 120 minutes.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 8 shooters enter the final

- The 8 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

10 shots fired in Standing position

- Shots are fired on command within a time limit of 75 seconds per shot.

- Each shot is evaluated in decimal tenths.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGET

The target is placed 50 meters far from the shooter’s stand

The target is divided into 10 rings.

10 RING DIAMETER

50 mm (about 2 inches)

The 10th ring is not wider then a small espresso cup. 

GUN

Single loaded, small bore pistol in 5.6 mm (.22”) calibre.

- A well fitting grip is used but this must not touch any part of the wrist.

- No restriction on weight, dimension or trigger pull.

SIGHTS

Only open sights are permitted

- No optical sights are used.

 

 

25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

STAGE 1

2 Series of 5 shots, each fired in 8 seconds

+

2 Series of 5 shots, each fired in 6 seconds

+

2 Series of 5 shots, each fired in 4 seconds

 

QUALIFICATION

STAGE 2

2 Series of 5 shots, each fired in 8 seconds

+

2 Series of 5 shots, each fired in 6 seconds

+

2 Series of 5 shots, each fired in 4 seconds

 

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 6 shooters enter the final

The qualification score does not count in the final.

FINAL

- Consists of 8 series

- Each finalist fires 4 Series of 5 shots

- From the 4th series on, after each series the shooter with the lowest score leaves the match, right to the 8th series, when the last two shooters duel for Gold.

- In case of ties, direct-elimination shoot-offs will be conducted

- Each series (5 shots) must be fired in rapid sequence within a maximum of 4 seconds.

- Each shot is evaluated as a “hit” or a “miss”.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest number of hits wins

The “Final Score” is the number of total hits scored.

TARGETS

5 different targets placed 75 cm apart, 25 meters far from the shooter’s stand

 The “HIT” ring on the target surface corresponds to 9.7 points or better.

"HIT" RING DIAMETER

Corresponds to 9.7 points or better

This is the only Shooting Sport Olympic event using an “hit or miss” logic.

GUN

Rapid Fire Pistol in 5.6mm (.22”) calibre, with a five-shot magazine

- Maximum weight of 1400 g

- Minimum triggers pull weight of 1000 g

- The pistol must be capable of fitting into a box of 300 x 150 x 50 mm

- The pistol grip has various restrictions on shape and dimensions and must not touch any part of the wrist.

SIGHTS

Only open sights are permitted

- No optical sights are used.

 

 

25m Pistol Women

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION 1

Precision Stage

6 Series of 5 shots each, fired in Standing position

- A time of 5 minute is given to fire each series.

-Shots are fired on a Precision Target (see below).

QUALIFICATION 2

Rapid Fire Stage

6 Series of 5 shots each, fired in Standing position

- A time of 3 second is given to fire each shot, with a break of 7 second between the series.

- Shots are fired on a Rapid Fire Target (see below)

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 8 shooters enter the final

-The scores gained in the two qualification stages are added to obtain the “Qualification score”.

FINAL

4 Series of 5 shots, each fired in Standing position

- A time of 3 second is given to fire each shot.

- Each shot is evaluated in decimal tenths.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

PRECISION TARGET

Single target placed 25 meters far from the shooter’s stand

10th Ring diameter: 50 mm

RAPID FIRE TARGET

Single target placed 25 meters far from the shooter’s stand

10th Ring diameter: 100 mm

GUN

Pistol in 5.6 mm (.22 long rifle) calibre, with a five-shot magazine

- Maximum weight of 1400 g

- Minimum triggers pull weight of 1000 g

- The pistol must be capable of fitting into a box of 300 x 150 x 50 mm

- The pistol grip has various restrictions on shape and dimensions and must not touch any part of the wrist.

SIGHTS

Only open sights are permitted

No optical sights are used.

 

 

10m Air Pistol Men

 

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

60 shots fired in Standing position

- Prior to the first competition shot, any number of sighting shots may be fired.

- Shots are fired within a time limit of 105 minutes.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 8 shooters enter the final

- The 8 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

10 shots fired in Standing position

- Shots are fired on command within a time limit of 75 seconds per shot.

- Each shot is evaluated in decimal tenths.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGET

The target is placed 10 meters far from the shooter’s stand

The target is divided into 10 rings.

10 RING DIAMETER

11,5 mm (about 0,45 inches)

The 10th ring is smaller then a eurocent or a dollar cent coin.

GUN

Single loaded pistol in 4.5 mm (.177”) calibre

- Maximum weight of 1500 g

- The trigger pull must be a minimum of 500 g.

- The pistol grip must not go past the hand nor touch any part of the wrist.

- The pellet is propelled by air either by an external level or by pre-compressed air or CO2 cylinder.

SIGHTS

Only open sights are permitted

- No optical sights are used.

 

 

10m Air Pistol Women

 

SPECIFICATION

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

40 shots fired in Standing position

- Prior to the first competition shot, any number of sighting shots may be fired.

- Shots are fired within a time limit of 75 minutes.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 8 shooters enter the final

- The 8 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

10 shots fired in Standing position

- Shots are fired on command within a time limit of 75 seconds per shot.

- Each shot is evaluated in decimal tenths.

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGET

The Target is placed 10 meters far from the shooter’s stand

The target is divided into 10 rings.

10 RING DIAMETER

11,5 mm (about 0,45 inches)

The 10th ring is smaller then a eurocent or a dollar cent coin.

GUN

Single loaded pistol in 4.5 mm (.177”) calibre

- Maximum weight of 1500 g

- The trigger pull must be a minimum of 500 g.

- The pistol grip must not go past the hand nor touch any part of the wrist.

- The pellet is propelled by air either by an external level or by pre-compressed air or CO2 cylinder.

SIGHTS

Only open sights are permitted

- No optical sights are used.

SHOTGUN Events

 

  • The competition consists in a qualification and a final round.
  • Shooters, drawn in squads of 6, must stand on designated shooting stations to shoot at clay targets that are released on or after the shooter’s command.
  • A “HIT” is declared when the target is shot and at least 1 visible piece is seen by the Referee to fall from it.
  • The shooter who hits the most targets (qualification rounds + final) wins.
  • Shotguns and Cartridges - Shotguns differ from rifles and pistols in that they are smooth bored rather than “rifled” and fire a number of pellets rather than a single projectile. The maximum effective range for clay target shooting is considered to be about 50m.
  • “Clay” Targets - The modern flying saucer shaped targets that are now shot in competitions are not now made of clay but of pitch and chalk. They are approximately 110 mm x 25 mm (4” x 1”). Targets are generally orange coloured for better sighting, and the targets used in Finals rounds also contain a coloured powder highlighting the HITS (so called “flash targets”).
  • Target Throwing Machines - These are called “traps”. They are sophisticated automatic machines that are capable of throwing a clay target the trajectories and distances required for each event. The target is released by the trap via a microphone system that reacts to the shooter’s call.


Trap Men

The Trap event is considered to be shotgun’s “long range” contest.

Trap shooters use double-barrelled guns because in the qualification stages 2 shots are permitted at each target. During the final round, only one shot is permitted at each target.

Targets are released from an underground bunker, which has 15 trap machines in a straight line below ground level, set to throw targets at various heights, angles and speeds, away from the shooter.

The shooters shoot in turn from 5 designated shooting stations set 15m back from the front edge of the bunker roof and about 3 meters apart. The shooter does not know from which trap the target will be thrown but all shooters shoot at the same kind of targets at sometime during the round.

A round consists of 25 targets for each shooter.

 

 

SPECIFICATIONS

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

125 clays in 5 rounds of 25 targets

- Shooters, divided in squads of 6, fire 5 qualification rounds of 25 targets each.

- 2 shots are permitted at each target.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 6 shooters enter the final

- The 6 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

1 round of 25 targets

- 1 shot is permitted at each target (the second barrel can’t be used).

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGETS

Clay target about 110 mm (4 inches) in diameter and about 25 mm (1 inch) in height.

Targets are coloured in bright orange for better sighting and the targets used in final rounds also contain a powder which is more easily seen (so called flash targets).

GUN

Shotgun

- 12 gauge

- Single trigger, “over-under” shotgun (one barrel above the other).

- Loaded with smooth bored shells with a maximum of 24.5 g of pellets



Trap Women

The Trap event is considered to be shotgun’s “long range” contest.

Trap shooters use double-barrelled guns because in the qualification stages 2 shots are permitted at each target. During the final round, only one shot is permitted at each target.

Targets are released from an underground bunker, which has 15 trap machines in a straight line below ground level, set to throw targets at various heights, angles and speeds, away from the shooter.

The shooters shoot in turn from 5 designated shooting stations set 15m back from the front edge of the bunker roof and about 3 meters apart. The shooter does not know from which trap the target will be thrown but all shooters shoot at the same kind of targets at sometime during the round.

A round consists of 25 targets for each shooter.

 

 

SPECIFICATIONS

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

75 clays in 3 rounds of 25 targets

- Shooters, divided in squads of 6, fire 5 qualification rounds of 25 targets each.

- 2 shot are permitted at each target.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 6 shooters enter the final

- The 6 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

1 round of 25 targets

- 1 shot only is permitted at each target (the second barrel can’t be used).

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGETS

Clay target about 110 mm (4 inches) in diameter and about 25 mm (1 inch) in height.

Targets are coloured in bright orange for better sighting and the targets used in final rounds also contain a powder which is more easily seen (so called flash targets).

GUN

Shotgun

- 12 gauge

- Single trigger, “over-under” shotgun (one barrel above the other).

- Loaded with smooth bored shells with a maximum of 24.5 g of pellets.



Skeet Men

Skeet is considered a “short range” event.

Shooters fire from 8 different designated shooting stations at a series of “singles” and simultaneous “doubles”, which are thrown from two different trap houses (“high house” and “low house”) situated at each end of an arc of a circle of about 40 m diameter.

Shooters may fire only 1 shot per target. Shooters must also hold their shotgun stock on or below an official marker tape, which is fixed at elbow level, until the target appears.

Targets are thrown on shooter’s command after a variable delay (0-3 seconds)

The men's match consists in a qualification of 125 targets, shot in five rounds of 25 over 2 days. Three qualification rounds are fired on day one; two qualification rounds plus the final are shot on day two.

Following the qualifications, the top six shooters advance to a 25 target “Finals” round.

Medals are awarded on the total of the Qualification and the Final scores.

 

SPECIFICATIONS

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

125 clays in 5 rounds of 25 targets

- Shooters, divided in squads of 6, fire 5 qualification rounds of 25 targets each over two days.

- 1 shot is permitted at each target.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 6 shooters enter the final

- The 6 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

1 round of 25 targets

 

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGETS

Clay target about 110 mm (4 inches) in diameter and about 25 mm (1 inch) in height.

Targets are coloured in bright orange for better sighting and the targets used in final rounds also contain a powder which is more easily seen (so called flash targets).

GUN

Shotgun

- 12 gauge

- Single trigger, “over-under” shotgun (one barrel above the other).

- Loaded with smooth bored shells with a maximum of 24.5 g of pellets.


Skeet Women

Skeet is considered a “short range” event.

Shooters fire from 8 different designated shooting stations at a series of “singles” and simultaneous “doubles”, which are thrown from two different trap houses (“high house” and “low house”) situated at each end of an arc of a circle of about 40 m diameter.

Shooters may fire only 1 shot per target. Shooters must also hold their shotgun stock on or below an official marker tape, which is fixed at elbow level, until the target appears.

Targets are thrown on shooter’s command after a variable delay (0-3 seconds)

The women’s match consists in a qualification of 75 targets, shot in three rounds of 25 over 1 day.

Following the qualifications, the top six shooters advance to a 25 target “Finals” round.

Medals are awarded on the total of the Qualification and the Final scores.

 

SPECIFICATIONS

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

75 clays in 3 rounds of 25 targets

- Shooters, divided in squads of 6, fire 5 qualification rounds of 25 targets each over one day.

- 1 shot is permitted at each target.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 6 shooters enter the final

- The 6 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

1 round of 25 targets

 

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGETS

Clay target about 110 mm (4 inches) in diameter and about 25 mm (1 inch) in height.

Targets are coloured in bright orange for better sighting and the targets used in final rounds also contain a powder which is more easily seen (so called flash targets).

WEAPON

Shotgun

- 12 gauge

- Single trigger, “over-under” shotgun (one barrel above the other).

- Loaded with smooth bored shells with a maximum of 24.5 g of pellets.


Double Trap Men

Double Trap is considered the “medium range” event.

The shooters (in squads of six) shoot in turn from 5 designated shooting stations set 15m back from the front edge of the bunker roof.

Upon shooter’s command, 2 targets (the “double” or “couple”) are released simultaneously within a period of 0 ~ 1 second from the trap machines in centre of the bunker. The 2 targets travel at different heights and angles and a round consist of 25 “doubles” (for a total of 50 targets). The shooters fire 1 shot at each target.

 

SPECIFICATIONS

DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

150 clays in 3 rounds of 50 targets.

 

- The targets are thrown in couples (the “doubles”).

- Shooters, divided in squads of 6, fire 3 qualification rounds of 25 “doubles” (50 targets) each.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR THE FINAL?

The best 6 shooters enter the final

- The 6 shooters with the highest “Qualification score” enter the final.

FINAL

1 round of 50 targets

The targets are thrown in couples (the “doubles”).

WHO WINS THE MATCH?

The shooter who totalizes the highest “Total score” wins

“Qualification” and “Final” scores are added to determinate the “Total score”.

TARGETS

Clay target about 110 mm (4 inches) in diameter and about 25 mm (1 inch) in height.

Targets are coloured in bright orange for better sighting and the targets used in final rounds also contain a powder which is more easily seen (so called flash targets).

WEAPON

Shotgun

- 12 gauge

- Single trigger, “over-under” shotgun (one barrel above the other).

- Loaded with smooth bored shells with a maximum of 24.5 g of pellets.

 

Rules And Procedures

Differences between the ISSF World Championships and Olympic Games
On the programme of the Olympic Games 2008, there are 15 shooting events. At the ISSF World Championships there are 55: there are additional 300m rifle events, 50m running target events as well as further 50m rifle, 25m pistol, 10m running target events and additional shotgun events.  In most events there are four categories: Men, Women, Men Junior and Women Junior. All events at ISSF World Championships are held in individual and team competitions (three team members).

Tie Break Procedures

In the Qualification rounds of rifle and pistol events (except for 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men) to decide who qualifies for the finals ties are broken by comparing the inner tens (a smaller ring inside the ten used for deciding ties) scored by the shooters thorughout the all qualification series. If the score remains tied, then the shooters have to go trough a shoot-off to decie the finalists.

In the Qualification rounds of all Shotgun events and the 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men event, shoot-offs are held to break ties to decide who should participate in the Finals. In all Finals, shoot-offs will be used to break any ties.

Penalties / Disqualification Rules

Score Protests: a shooter may make a Score Protest about the value of a shot. If this is denied a two-point penalty is automatically incurred. Such protests are resolved by the Classification Jury using accredited techniques. Other Penalties / Disqualification are in accordance with the ISSF Rules. Most common reasons for penalties are cross-fired shots, and for disqualification failure of rifle clothing being too stiff, and failure of pistol trigger weight test (too light).

Appeals and Protests

In accordance with the ISSF Rules, events have specific protest/appeal times. Official results are not published until problems, if any, are resolved. For the benefit of the Media and Spectators, Preliminary Results may be released for some events.

Records

Olympic Records (OR) may be established only in the Olympic shooting events in the Olympic Games.
World Records (WR) and Junior World Records (WRJ) may be established in all recognized ISSF Men's, Women's and Junior events, and in Olympic Games, ISSF World Championships, ISSF World Cup Finals, ISSF World Cups, Continental Championships and Continental Games which have been conducted according to the ISSF Rules.
Final Olympic Records (FOR) may be established only in the Olympic shooting events in the Olympic Games.
Final World Records (FWR) may be established only in Olympic events for Men and Women in all ISSF recognised championships and are comprised of the results of the Qualification added to the results of the Finals for each event.

How to qualify for the Olympic Games

Since 1988 the Participation in the Olympic Shooting events is not guaranteed. Each national shooting federation must earn "Quota Places”.

The quota place distribution for the 2012 Olympic Games of London will start in the year 2010.

Participation

Before an athlete may participate in the Olympic Shooting events the NOC must have earned a "Quota Place".

Quota Places

Quota Places are generally awarded when an athlete wins a gold medal at the ISSF World Cups, or achieves a high place at the World Championships or at a Continental Championship in Africa, America, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, in the three years preceding the Olympic year.

A Quota Place guarantees that someone from a given country, not necessarily the athlete who earned it, may compete in that Olympic event. Each athlete who wins or obtains one (1) of the following named places in the Olympic events obtains one (1) qualification place (quota place) for his/her NOC in the Olympic Games.

The maximum number of qualified athletes is 28 per NOC, the maximum qualification per event is two (2) athletes per NOC, except in the Trap and Skeet events for women in which the qualification is limited per NOC to one (1) athlete only.

One (1) athlete can obtain only one (1) quota place for his/her NOC in any event. If a quota place is won in an event by an athlete who has already won a quota place in any event, the quota place will be granted to the NOC of the next ranking athlete.

Each athlete, however, who has been entered in one event in a quota place by his/her NOC can be entered as a double starter in other events if he/she has also obtained the Minimum Qualification Scores (MQS) in the other events. NOCs are not allowed to enter more than two (2) shooters in any event.

On request of an NOC/ISSF Member Federation, one quota place in one event can be changed for one quota place in any other event if available.

Unused quota places will be reallocated by the ISSF and the Tripartite Commission. Where possible, they will be reallocated to the next highest ranked athletes at qualification events from NOCs not already qualified.

Tripartite Commission Invitation Places

Athletes granted Invitation places must have achieved the MQS.

Universality Places



Minimum Qualification Score (MQS)

Only athletes who have attained the Minimum Qualification Score (MQS) can be entered in one (1) or more events on the Olympic shooting program.

The MQS results can be achieved in specific qualification competitions such as ISSF World Championships, ISSF World Cup Finals, ISSF World Cups, Continental Championships and regional competitions which have the MQS status during the years 2010, 2011 and in the first half of 2012 before the Olympic Games. The minimum qualification scores (MQS) have been established as follows:

Disciplines

Events for Men

MQS

Events for Women

MQS

 

Rifle

50m Rifle 3 Positions

50m Rifle Prone

10m Air Rifle

1135

587

570

50m Rifle 3 Positions

 

10m Air Rifle

555

 

375

 

Pistol

50m Pistol

25m Rapid Fire Pistol

10m Air Pistol

540

560

563

 

25m Pistol

10m Air Pistol

 

555

365

 

Shotgun

Trap

Double Trap

Skeet

112

118

114

Trap

 

Skeet

58

 

60



Shooting Heros at the Games

Every era has its own heroes. The passion shooters have for their sport has not changed since shooting sport was first introduced to the Olympic Games in 1896. Olympic history abounds with tales of athletes who overcame crippling adversity to win gold medals.


No discussion is needed when it comes to naming Olympic shooting’s first family. The remarkable records of Oscar and Alfred Swahn make heroes for the ages. 


Together father Oscar and son Alfred Swahn won 15 medals at four Olympic Games. In London 1908, the Swedes dominated the running deer event and Oscar and Alfred Swahn were both members of the team. The 60-year old Oscar opened the medal hunting for the Swahn family by winning a gold and bronze medal in the individual competition and added gold together with his son in the team match. In Stockholm 1912, the home race for the Swahn family, Alfred won his first individual gold medal and both repeated their gold medal victory with the team. Also for 1920 Antwerp the Swahns were chosen to represent their country at the Games and returned “high” decorated with medals back home. Oscar was part of the team and won silver at the age of 72 years: he was the oldest medallist in the history of the Games – a record that still stands and is unlikely to be challenged. Alfred went to Paris 1924 without his father. Although Oscar had been named to the team, he was ill at the Games time and could not attend. Alfred kept up the family tradition by winning two more bronze and one silver. This was the last time Swahn appeared at the Games.


Karoly Takacs was part of Hungary's world-champion pistol-shooting team in 1939 when an army grenade exploded in his right hand. Nine years later, he won the first gold medal in rapid-fire pistol at the Olympic Games in London 1948 and won another Olympic Gold medal at the next Games in Helsinki in 1952 - after teaching himself to shoot left-handed.


In the seventies and eighties, Sweden’s Ragnar Skanaker hit his peak by winning one gold and two silver medals in the 50m Pistol event. This promising newcomer won the gold medal at the Olympic Games in Munich 1972 and from then on one could not imagined the shooting sport without the presence of this Swedish athlete. In 1992 Skanaker won his last Olympic Bronze medal in Barcelona. After a break, the now seventy year old athlete has returned to his sport and is again a serious opponent amongst the international competing athletes.


The name that stands for 2000’s shooting sport hero is Ralf Schumann from Germany. Schumann who united discipline, accuracy and passion. In his sport , the 25m Rapid Fire Pistol, he has already made a name for himself by winning three Olympic Gold medals in the Rapid Fire Pistol event in Barcelona 1992, Atlanta 1996 and Athens 2004. Despite ongoing changes in the shooting sport, which influences training and performances, Ralf Schumann is still the ambitious enthusiast of today’s and tomorrows shooting sport.


The Rifle shooter Katerina Emmons (CZE) and the Pistol shooter Jin Jong Oh (KOR) bounded their named to the 2008 Olympic Games of Beijing. Katerina Emmons won the 10m Air Rifle Women event, gaining the very first Gold medal of the 2008 Olympic Games. She closed her participation in the sport festival with a double success by gaining Silver in the 50m Rifle 3 Positions Women event. Jin Jong Oh, a successful Korean Pistol shooter that had distinguished also at the 2004 Games, won Gold and Silver at the 50m Pistol Men and at the 10m Air Pistol Men events. The two shooters were also named "Shooter of the Year 2008" by a special commission of the AIPS, the International Association of the Sport Press.

The shooting sport at the Olympic Games

In 1896, the modern Olympic Games began, through the efforts of the Frenchman Baron Pierre de Coubertin, who made his life's work to resurrect the Olympic dream that had first begun in ancient Greece several centuries before the common area. In Athens, Greece the first modern Olympic Games were conducted with nine sports and the former French pistol champion, Pierre de Coubertin supported the inclusion of two big-bore rifle and three pistol events on the Olympic program.

Up until today Shooting Sport just had missed twice to be on the Olympic program. Shooting Sport competitions were not held at the 3rd Games 1904 in St. Louis, USA and at the Games 1928 in Amsterdam, NED.

The list of events has been modified at successive Games in the light of how guns have evolved, taking account also of customs and tradition. Until 1924, the Shooting program contained a multitude of events that were subsequently dropped: 31 events at all. 17 of these 31 events appeared on the program just once, and further nine appeared twice. This shows how unstable the program was at that time. After a “break” in 1928, shooting returned to the Olympics in 1932 with only two events - one for pistols and one for rifles. Since World War II the programme has become relatively standardised.

Of the events that were dropped, it is worth mentioning the 300m rifle, which was included in the program of 12 times until 1972 which had been one of the three shooting events on the program since 1896. Individual and team events were fired until 1948, when team competitions were eliminated by the ISSF- International Shooting Sport federation, former UIT - International Shooting Federation.

Women were first allowed to compete in Olympic shooting in 1968. In that year Mexico, Peru and Poland each entered one female contestant. Women have competed with the men until 1980. At the 1984 Games, women took part for the first time in a separate program consisting of three events. Between 1984 and 1992 the number of women's events increased gradually. In addition, trap and skeet events remained mixed, i.e. open to both men and women.

As of 1996 in Atlanta, the shooting programme was segregated, with men's events being separated from the women's. More recently, the double trap events for men and women were added to the Olympic programme.

Participation has crown steadily through the years. While only 31 known competitors from seven nations competed in the shooting events at the first Games Athens in 1896, 462 shooters participated from 68 nations at the 1984 Los Angeles Games. In the following Games the participation was restricted by the IOC quota rule and the IOC has approved a total quota of 3400 athletes in Seoul 1988 who came from 66 nations.

At the 2004 Athens Olympic Games 390 athletes were accepted for participation, where 253 men and 157 women from 106 nations took part in 17 shooting events.

The Olympic Program changed for the 2008 Games, and the number of shooting events passed from 17 to 15. Running Target and Double Trap Women events were discontinued. In spite of the events reduction, the participation increased, and 390 shooters  coming from more then 100 countries took part in the 2008 Olympic Games of Beijing.